Is Microwaving Food in Plastic Bowls Safe?

Let’s deal with the first half-truth here: The primary notifications cautioned that microwaved plastic discharges cancer-causing chemicals (dioxins) into food. The issue with that warning is that plastic doesn’t have dioxins. They are formed when plastics, wood, metals, garbage and other materials are burned. The truth is if you don’t burn your food in a microwave, you aren’t subjecting your food to dioxins.

There’s no single substance named “plastic.” That term covers several materials crafted from a number of inorganic or organic compounds. Substances are frequently added to plastic to aid in stabilizing or shaping it. Two of these plasticizers are:

Phthalates which is added to make plastic flexible and soft

Bisphenol-A (BPA) which is added to make hard and clear plastic

Phthalates and BPA are thought to be endocrine disrupters. These are elements that mimic human hormones and not in a good way.

When food is covered in plastic or in a plastic container and microwaved, phthalates and BPA could get into the food. Any leak is going to be greater with fatty foods like cheeses and meats.

Is Styrofoam microwave safe?

Opposite to popular belief, some Styrofoam containers can be safely used in the microwave. Just obey the same rule you would when you use other sort of containers in the microwave: Read the label!

If you’re worried about plastic containers or plastics in the microwave, put food in ceramic or glass container that can be used in microwave ovens.

Don’t allow the plastic wrap to touch your food during microwaving because it could melt. Parchment paper, paper towels, a microwave cover, or wax paper that fits over your bowl or plate are better substitutes.

Takeout/plastic containers, tubs or jars that held yogurt, whipped topping, butter, mayo, and other foods aren’t microwave-safe.